Checklist.

I was actually very happy this Monday, strange I know, but right now, everything to do with my (part of the) project seems to be going very smoothly. My team is primarily focused on the technical discovery for the next feature, which leaves me with a bit of breathing time to focus on the backlog.

Not that it was easy to get to this point. It took us quite a while to get to a point where everyone was aligned and understood what our next steps should be. Now that we have switched to agile, everyone involved in the process is less and less comfortable with the idea of spending time on anything that may not yield shippable software. Problem is, this next feature we are working on is so complex, involving multiple systems, multiple skill sets and processes that we simply needed the extra time.

We already spent a few weeks digging into and defining the business process – we really needed to also allow the same focus on the technical discovery to make this piece of the puzzle work – and more importantly work well! But, how can we communicate what we need to do, show our progress and make everybody understand the value?

Well, we ended up trying various different approaches and quite frankly, in the end, the most effective way of communication was a checklist, albeit combined with a couple of fancy graphs to make it interesting. Having a clear list of what we needed to do and investigate in order to be able to move forward with this feature was ultimately what we all needed in order to move forward. For our team, it gives us clear direction on what to work on now and next and for our stakeholder outside, it gives them a good idea of exactly what we are going to deliver and when.

Being a big fan of lists – I make lists for everything, literally – it was more of a compulsion to create a list of tasks and I did it primarily for myself to get my head around the process. In the end however, it turned out that it gave us and leadership the direction we really needed to stop talking about how we might do what and just get started and get stuff done. We eventually turned our checklist into stories, so now they live as our spike backlog and we can create the usual burnup charts that show our progress and productivity – making sure our stakeholders are happy  and informed.

So, we are now back in the world of scrum, with backlogs, showcases and burnup charts, but in the beginning, there was my good old friend: the checklist. I couldn’t have done it without you!