The Gift of Feedback?

After an interesting conversation among my fellow Product Owners yesterday, I thought today’s post should be about something we always ask for, often receive and are not always happy about: feedback. In the English language of the corporate world, this is often referred to as the “gift of feedback”. For me, this expression always holds a certain sense of irony. While in English “gift” pretty simply means something that is given, in my native language German, “Gift” actually translates as poison.

Of course feedback is always a good thing, after all, what good is anything if I am the only one who thinks so, but there are certainly occasions where feedback can “poison a plan” – a sprint plan for example. Every now and then one of our showcases throws light on some additional feature, nuance and business scenario previously unaccounted for which the scrum team then dutifully investigates, vets and puts on the sprint plan for the next iteration. Perfect agile process, right?

The problem is though, since the showcase is at the end of a sprint, invariably most of the sprint planning for the following sprint has already been done by the team’s PO. Having to incorporate another item that late in the game does not a happy developer make! Agile scrum in itself is already a very challenging process at the best of times and including showcase feedback aka added scope at the last minute before the start of a sprint only increases the pressure.

So, what to do? Unless the basic principle of improving a product by iteration is completely thrown overboard, we must continually ask for feedback, digest it and include in our product moving forward. Otherwise, we are no longer agile, we are just “waterfalling” within a somewhat agile structure. The question remains though, what is the best way to accommodate feedback without disrupting the work for the following sprint? Schedule it to be done later, the following sprint perhaps? Plus, by simply accepting whatever feedback is given to us in a showcase and immediately implementing it in the next sprint, are we missing the opportunity to dive deeper into what we are missing and taking the time to truly understand the customer ask?

What about you – in your scrum process, how do you avoid the “Gift” in feedback?

Innovate!

I was going to write a proper post today, now that I am back in the office, but then I found the below article and I felt compelled to share it. In my opinion, it is such an accessible and apt description of what it takes to innovate that I think can enlighten and inspire anyone to try doing things in an agile way.

5 Steps to build a more innovative organization by The Staffing Advisor

Thinking about agile? Don’t hesitate, innovate!